Article #6

ARTICLE REFERENCE

McMahon, S. D., Rose, D. R., & Parks, M. (2004). Multiple intelligences and reading achievement: An examiniation of the Teele Inventory of Multiple Intelligences. The Journal of Experimental Education, 73(1), 41-52. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/20157383

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of the Teele Inventory of Multiple Intelligences and the relationship between intellectual preferences and reading achievement.

METHOD

The study included 288 fourth graders. Each participant completed the TIMI. Students’ reading comprehension was measured using the Gates-MacGinite Test of Reading. Correlation analyses were conducted to determine the relationships between each of the intelligences as well as between the MI scores and reading comprehension skills.

OUTCOMES

Reliability analyses suggest the TIMI is not a reliable measurement tool (perhaps students are seeing different things in the pictures, that influence their choices).
The TIMI showed little evidence of relationships between MI preferences and reading comprehension skills.
Students with a preference for logical-mathematical intelligence demonstrated stronger reading comprehension skills.

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IMPLICATIONS FOR CHANGE PROJECT

Although this study examined reading comprehension skills in relation to the multiple intelligences, what drew me to it most, was the mention of an assessment tool (the TIMI) used to determine multiple intelligence preferences of K-12 students. Although I found several survey options online, I was looking for something more visual to use with Kindergarten students when implementing the Respecting Diversity program. This study indicates it is not a reliable tool.

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